Esther Doyle Read, copyright 2003

New 22 May 2003

READ FAMILY CONNECTIONS

SAMUEL READ4

335. SAMUEL READ4 (Aaron Read, II3, Samuel Read2, Joseph Read1) was born 25 July 1837 in New Jersey and died 21 January 1914 in New Jersey. He married circa 1864, Phebe Elizabeth "Lizzie" Stiles. She was born 1841 in New Jersey and died 1935. Samuel and Lizzie are buried in the Mt Hermon Methodist Church Yard (also known as Green's Chapel), Mt Hermon, Hope Township, Warren County, New Jersey.

Samuel and Lizzie had three children born between 1866 and 1870. I have identified three grandchildren born between 1907 and 1914. Total identified descendants equals 6.

Children of Samuel Read and Phebe Elizabeth Stiles
Biographical Notes
References
Probate Records of Aaron Read

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Surname Index

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CHILDREN OF SAMUEL READ AND PHEBE ELIZABETH STILES:

707. (i.) OGDEN STILES READ5, was born 27 July 1866 in Hope Township, Warren County, New Jersey and died 14 November 1866, age 3 months and 13 days. He is buried in the Mt Hermon Methodist Church Yard (also known as Green's Chapel), Mt Hermon, Hope Township, Warren County, New Jersey.

708. (ii.) CLIFFORD KINGSLEY READ5, was born 30 November 1867 in Hope Township, Warren County, New Jersey and died 5 August 1931. In the 1900 United States Federal Census he is listed as a resident of Hope Township, Warren County, New Jersey. He was single and living with his parents. He was not living with his parents in 1910. Clifford married circa 1904, Edna Last Name Unknown. He was a lawyer. The family resided at 125 Hudson Avenue in Ridgefield Park, Bergan County, New Jersey (1930 United States Census, Enumeration District 3B, Village of Ridgefield Park, Overpack Township, Bergen County, New Jersey, sheet 3B, 4 April 1931). Clifford is buried in the Mt Hermon Methodist Church Yard (also known as Green's Chapel), Mt Hermon, Hope Township, Warren County, New Jersey. Children of Clifford Read:

1336. (i.) EDWARD S. READ6, was born circa 1907 in New Jersey and died unknown. In 1930, he lived with his parents and his grandmother Read in Ridgefield Park, NewJersey. He worked as an operator for a radio company (1930 United States Census, Enumeration District 3B, Village of Ridgefield Park, Overpack Township, Bergen County, New Jersey, sheet 3B, 4 April 1931; Kern 1938).

1337. (ii.) FLORENCE "HAZEL" READ6, was born circa 1920, New Jersey and died unknown. She was known as Hazel to her family. In 1930, she lived at home with her parents and grandmother Read in Rigdefield Park, New Jersey and worked as a stenographer in a lawyer's office (1930 United States Census, Enumeration District 3B, Village of Ridgefield Park, Overpack Township, Bergen County, New Jersey, sheet 3B, 4 April 1931; Kern 1938).

1338. (iii.) MARJORIE E. READ6, was born circa 1914 in New Jersey and died unknown. In 1930, Marjorie was 16 years old. She was not attending school. However, she had already begun a career as a professional dancer on the stage. She lived at home with her parents and her grandmother Read (1930 United States Census, Enumeration District 3B, Village of Ridgefield Park, Overpack Township, Bergen County, New Jersey, sheet 3B, 4 April 1931; Kern 1938).

709. (iii.) ARTHUR L. READ5, was born 5 December 1870 in Hope Township, Warren County, New Jersey and died 30 May 1872. He is buried in the Mt Hermon Methodist Church Yard (also known as Green's Chapel), Mt Hermon, Hope Township, Warren County, New Jersey.

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BIOGRAPHICAL NOTES:

Samuel Read was the first son and third child of Aaron Read, II and Hannah Brands. He was born in Knowlton Township, Warren County, New Jersey on 25 July 1837. He was probably named after his grandfather Samuel Read. His parents farm was near the village of Green's Chapel (now Mount Hermon). In 1839, Mount Hermon became part of the newly formed Hope Township. Samuel is named as the son of Aaron Read in his will, which was written on 7 November 1887. Aaron bequeathed a share of his estate to Samuel and Samuel's sister Kate (then Catherine Kirkhuff the widow of Anthony), as well as to Samuel's neice and nephew, the children of his late sister, Sarah Cooke (Warren County Surrogate Court Records, hereinafter WCSCR, Wills Book 10, page 391).

Samuel appears as a resident of Aaron's household on the 1840 census as a male under the age of 5 years (1840 United States Federal Census, Hope Township, Warren County, New Jersey, page 5). He was still a resident of their household in 1850 and was attending the local schools in Hope Township with his sisters Sarah, Kate and Martha (1850 United States Federal Census, Hope Township, Warren County, New Jersey, page 437B). The year after the census, Samuel's older sisters began to marry. First his sister Sarah Maria married Andrew Teel Cook on 20 September 1851. The ceremony was performed, by the Rev. R. Van Horn, the pastor of the Wolftown Methodist Episcopal Church in Knowlton Township (Snell 1881: 634; Warren Journal, 16 October 1851). Five years later, on News Year Eve 1856, his sister Kate married Anthony "Johnson" Kirkhuff.

Samuel was still living at home with his parents in 1860. His older sister Sarah Cook had moved back in with her parents and had brought her 7 year old daughter Alveretta Cook with her. His younger sister Matha was still a resident of the household. Both Samuel and Martha were attending school. Samuel was 22 years old when the census was taken on 28 June 1860, he turned 23 a month later (1860 United States Federal Census, Hope Township, Warren County, New Jersey, page 7). It is possible that he was attending a college, although I do not have documentation for this.

For the Read family as a whole, the 1860s and early 1870s were marked by births, weddings and a series of tragic deaths. The first of the latter occured on 24 July 1862, when Anthony "Johnson" Kirkhuff died, he was the 25 year old husband of Samuel's sister Kate. Samuel Read and Johnson's brother, Robert Allison Kirkhuff acted as the executor's of the estate (WCSCR Surrogates Orders, Book 1, page 172). Approximately two years later, in about 1864, Samuel married. His bride was 23 year old Phebe Elizabeth Stiles, who was known as "Lizzie". The young couple settled on a farm in Hope Township near that of Aaron and Hannah Read. Their first son, Ogden Stiles Read was born two years later on 27 July 1866. Samuel's sister Sarah Maria Cooke had a son, David Brands Cook a few months later on 18 October 1866. Ogden died a month later on 14 November 1866, he was 3 months and 13 days old. Samuel and Lizzie buried him in the church yard of Green's Chapel Methodist Episcopal Church (now Mount Hermon United Methodist Church). His name is inscribed on the family monument in the cemetery (see below). Close to the monument is a smaller stone, placed in the cemetery by Samuel and Lizzie shortly after his death. It was field checked on 27 June 1983 and is inscribed:

Ogden Stiles
son of
Samuel & P.E.
Read
died
Nov. 14, 1866
aged 3 months & 13 days

Ogden's first cousin, David Brands Cooke, died five months later on 20 April 1867 and was also buried in the church yard of Greens Chapel (now Mount Hermon Methodist Church).

Samuel and Lizzie's second child and son, Clifford Kingsley Read, was born shortly after Thanksgiving of 1867, on the the 30th of November. When the census was enumerated on 15 August 1870, little Clifford was living with his parents in Hope Township. Samuel Read was a farmer. He owned real estate which was valued at $9,630. His personal estate had a value of $2,175. Samuel, Phebe and Clifford lived in dwelling number 198. Samuel' s parents Aaron and Hannah Read lived in dwelling number 195. Samuel's widowed sister Kate Kirkhuff and his unmarried sister Martha Read lived with Aaron and Hannah. Several unrelated individuals also lived with Samuel and Phebe Read. They included two farm hands, a domestic servant and a little old girl. The farm hands were 11 year old William Bennett and 17 year old Isaac Gardner. Emily Kidney (age 17) was a live-in domestic servant.Eight year old Adelia McKnight, also lived with the family, she did not attend school in 1870. Table 1 summarizes the individuals residing in Samuel's household in 1870:

Table 1: Household of Samuel and Lizzie Read in 1870
1870 United States Federal Census
Hope Township, Warren County, New Jersey, page 25, 15 August 1870

Name

Age

Birthplace

Samuel Read

33

NJ

Phebe E. Read

29

NJ

Clifford K. Read

2

NJ

Wm Bennett

11

NJ

Adelia McKnight

8

NJ

Isaac Gardner

17

NJ

Emily Kidney

17

NJ

Lizzie Read was expecting her third child when the census was enumerated. Arthur L. Read was born later that year on the fifth of December. The baby died when he was almost 18 months old on 30 May 1872. He was buried with his brother Ogden and cousin David Cooke in Greens Chapel church yard. Clifford Read was the only one of Lizzie and Samuel's three sons to survive (the 1900 census indicates that Lizzie was the mother of 3 children, only one of whom was living–1900 United States Federal Census, Enumeration District 189, Hope Township, Warren County, New Jersey, sheet 3B).

The family's trials were not over with Arthur's death. Sometime between 1870 and 1872, Samuel's sister Martha Read was married to a member of the Decker family. His first name is unknown. The couple's first and only child was born on 19 March 1873 and was named Kittle Decker. Martha lived less than a year after her son's birth. She died 19 December 1873 and was buried in Greens Chapel church yard. Kittle lived another four and a half months, he died 4 May 1874, aged 13 months, 20 days. Kittle was buried with his mother and his three cousins in Green Chapel's Church yard.

Samuel, Lizzie and Clifford continued to live on their farm after the death of baby Arthur. In addition to being a successful farmer, Samuel was also a musician. In December 1875, Samuel was one of the founding members of the Mount Hermon Coronet Band. Samuel was the leader. Other members of the band included several of Samuel's cousins and his only nephew, James Ira Cooke (the son of his siter Sarah Maria). Sylvester J. Treat, the band's president, was married to Samuel's second cousin Harriet Flumerfelt4 (Eleanor Read3, David Read2, Joseph Read1). Samuel's second cousin, John C. Flumerfelt 4 (Eleanor Read3, David Read2, Joseph Read1) was the band's secretary. John was Sylvester Treat's brother-in-law. Other members of the band were John T. Tinsman (the treasurer), Jefferson B. Loller (who's siter Margaret was married to Samuel's first cousin Ira C. Read4 (Martin Freese Read3, Samuel Read2, Joseph Read1), Aaron Brugler, Caleb Gibbs, Silas Gibbs, Ephraim Green, G. Leida, John Letson, John Melick, Asa Swayze, Jr., G.B. Swayze, John A. Swayze, Milton Tinsman, and W.L. Treat. Between 1875 and 1881 Charles Gibbs, George Green, Robert L. Letson, Alva Newman, Whitefield Swayze, and Winfield Swayze joinned the band (Snell 1881:667). According to the historian Snell, in 1881 "The Mount Hermon Cornet Band is the only civic or military organization in this township"i.e. Hope Township (ibid.). In addition to his activities with the band, Samuel also gave music lessons, instrumental and voice. According to the local historian Dale (2003:9) "he was loved by his devoted student".

The 1880 census indicates that Samuel and Lizzie were still living in Hope Township. They lived in dwelling 6, while Samuel's parents lived in dwelling 4. Samuel's sister Sarah Maria Cooke and her husband Andrew T. Cooke lived with Aaron and Hannah. Thirteen year old Clifford was attending school. The family had a live-in domestic servant named Martha Huff. She was 19 years old and was a native of New Jersey. The census does not list Samuel as a farmer, instead it indicates that he ran a nursery (1880 United State Federal Census, Enumeration District 199, Hope Township, Warren County, New Jersey, page 7, 7 June 1880). The 1887 Warren County History and Directory (Weaver and Kern 1887) lists Samuel as a farmer residing in Mount Hermon. Table 2 summarizes the individuals living in Samuel and Lizzie's household in 1880:

Table 2: Household of Samuel and Lizzie Read in 1880
(1880 United States Federal Census, Hope Township, Warren County, New Jersey, page 7)

Name

Age

Birthplace

Samuel Read

42

NJ

Lizzie P.E. Read

39

NJ

Clifford K. Read

13

NJ

Martha Huff

19

NJ

The 1880s and 1890s brought more changes to the structure of Samuel's family. His sister Sarah Maria Cooke had become a grandmother in 1879. Her first grandchild was born in Minnesota, where Sarah's daughter Alveretta Cooke Heir had settled with her husband Robert. Sarah died two years later and was buried in Green's Chapel church yard. Her husband Andrew left Mount Hermon and moved to Scranton, Pennsylvania, where he lived for several years before returning to Hope Township. Samuel's nephew by Sarah and Andrew, James I. Cooke, married during the 1880s. He and his wife Mary Tinsman had two children by the close of the decade, Kathryn (born 1886) and Herbert (born 1889). Samuel's other sister, Kate Kirkhuff, had moved to the city of Newark, New Jersey by 1880. Her daughter Sarah would marry during the 1880s and have her first child in 1887, a daughter named Grace Gardner. A second daughter named Marjorie was born circa 1896. While the family was growing, there were also two deaths. Samuel's mother, Hannah Brands Read died on 7 December 1889, she was 74 years old. Hannah was buried with her two daughters and three grandsons in Greens Chapel church yard. The year before she died, Aaron Read had written his will. He named his two surviving children, Samuel Read and Kate Kirkhuff, as the co-executors of his will. He left a legacy for Sarah Maria's two surviving children, gave Samuel and Kate $3,000 each and an equal share of the residue of the estate. Samuel also received Aaron's 30 acre home lot with its orchard and garden (WCSCR Wills Book 10, page 391). Aaron lived until 29 January 1898, he was 91 years old when he died. He was buried with Hannah and his children and grandchildren at Greeens Chapel.

By 1900, the number of individuals in Samuel's immmediate who still lived Hope Township was fairly small. These indidivuals included Samuel, Lizzie and their 32 year old son Clifford, and Samuel's nephew James Ira Cooke and his wife and two children. Samuel's sister Kate still lived in Newark. His neice Alveretta Heir probably still lived in the Mid-West. By 1900, Clifford Read had completed college and begun a career as a lawyer practicing in Hope Township. He was single and still lived at home with his parents. Samuel, now in his early 60s, was still a farmer. Lizzie, who was 59, still kept house for both men. The familly owned their farm, although they had a mortgage on the property at the time of the census, which was enumerated on 7 June 1900. Table 3 summarizes the Read family in 1900:

Table 3: Household of Samuel and Lizzie Read in 1900
(1900 United States Federal Census, Enumeration District 189,
Hope Township, Warren County, New Jersey, sheet 3B)

Name

Age

Birthplace

Samuel Read

62

NJ

Phoebe E. Read

59

NJ

Clifford K. Read

32

NJ

In 1910, Samuel and Lizzie lived on Mount hermon Road in Hope Township (table 4). Samuel was still a farmer. The mortgage on the farm had been paid off. Accorcing to the census the couple had been married 44 years (35 year in the 1900 census) and were the parents of three children, only one of whom (Clifford) was living in 1910. The only other resident of the household in 1910 was Pearl Blaine. Pearl was 9 years old, but the census indicates that she was a hired girl, or servant to the family. She lived with the Reads, worked for them and attended school (1910 United States Federal Census, Enumeration District 131, Hope Township, Warren County, New Jersey, sheet 12B, 4 May 1910). Pearl may have been related to Cornelia "Nelly" Blaine Read, the wife of Samuel's first cousin John C. Read4 (Samuel D. Read3, Samuel Read2, Joseph Read1. Samuel and Lizzie Read lived in dwelling 208; John C. and Nelly Read lived in dwelling 204. John and Nelly Read had one of Nelly's neices, six year old Annie Blaine living with them.

Table 4: Household of Samuel and Lizzie Read in 1910
(1910 United States Federal Census, Enumeration District 131,
Hope Township, Warren County, New Jersey, sheet 12B)

Name

Age

Birthplace

Samuel Read

72

NJ

Phoebe E. Read

69

NJ

Pearl Blaine

9

NJ

Samuel and Lizzie's son Clifford was not living with them in 1910 because he had finally married in about 1904. He was 36 years old when he married Edna (Last Name Unknown). According to the 1930 census, she and Clifford were the same age. Edna appears to have been previously married, as the 1930 census indicates that she was 24 years old at the time of her first marriage. This was eight year prior to her marriage to Clifford. She was about 36 when she married Clifford. The couple probably did not live in Hope.According to Kern (1938) and the 1930 census, they lived in Rigdefield Park, Bergen County, New Jersey. As the major portion of Kern's work was done in the first two decades of the twentieth century, They were probably living in Ridgefield Park in 1910. Clifford and Edna had three children: Edward S. Read (born circa 1907), Florence Hazel Read (born circa 1910) and Marjorie E. Read (born circa 1914). Clifford was still a lawyer in 1930 (1930 United States Federal Census, Enumeration District 12-182, Village of Ridgefield Park, Overpack Township, Bergen County, New Jersey, sheet 3B).

Samuel was involved in several business ventures. He operated a creamery. When telephones entered the homes in the towns and on the farmes of Hope Township, Samuel became the President of the Patron's Telephone Company (Dale 2003). Perhaps his most important buisness venture occurred in 1911 in the world of banking. The township of Hope did not have a bank. Mount Hermon was a small village, but the town of Hope was a market center. Several major roads met in Hope and the village supported a number of doctors and lawyers, as well a variety of mercantile, grocery and agricultural feed and suppy establishments. There was also a full component of blacksmiths, wheelwrights and other mechanics shops. The railroads had by-passed Hope, but the town had a thriving economy. In order to do their banking, the citizens of the town and township had to travel to the county seat at Belvidere or to Phililipsburg or across the Delaware River to Easton, Pennsylvania. Samuel joinned with several of Hope's leading buisnessmen to form the First National Bank of Hope. These men included Lewis C. Beatty, Sr. (who became the bank's director), John H. Huff, Harry R. Hurley, Richard Marshall Van Horn and Samuel Read. These men became the bank's Board of Directors (First Hope Bank n.d.). Richard M. Van Horn was a lawyer and was Samuel's first cousin once removed by marriage. His wife was Ada Minerva "Minnie" Read5, the daughter of Samuel's first cousin Ira C. Read4 (Martin Freese Read3, Samuel Read2, Joseph Read1).

The men set about raising the capital necessary to incorate the bank. During the summer of 1911 they sold 250 shares of stock in the venture at $100 per share. The $25,000 raised was the minimum required by the United States Treasury Department to charter a National Bank under the 1863 National Banking Act.. The Treasury Department sent a consultant to Hope later that year to review the proposed project. The consultant reported back that the bank was a viable venture. On 21 December 1911, the First National Bank of Hope was incoporated under New Jersey state law. The next step in the process was to find a building suitable for housing the bank. The Board of Directors settled on the "Old Moravian Inn" (First Hope Bank). This building had been built as the church or Gemeinhaus by the original Moravian settlers of Hope. The church was described in 1778 by General du Chastellux, a part of La Fayette's staff, who passed through the village during the Amerian Revolution. He toured the town and the church, which he described as:

a square building containing the house for the minister. The place where the duty is performed, and which may properly be called the Church, is on the first floor and resembles the Presbyterian meeting-houses, with the difference that there is an organ and some religious pictures (as quoted in Race 1891:203-204).

The Moravians eventually decided that their religious experiment in New Jersey had not become as successful as they had planned. They sold the whole town and left New Jersey on 7 April 1808. Over the next 103 years the Moravian church was used as a residence, a public school, and as a courthouse for both Sussex and Warren Counties. In 1828, it was converted to a hotel and was known as the Union Hotel from 1828 until 1894. After 1894 it was run as a hotel under the name of the Old Moravian Inn. During the nineteenth century the Union Hotel served as a stop on the Philadelphia to Newburg, New York stage line. By 1911, the need for a large hotel in Hope had ceased, as most travel was by rail. The owners sold the building to the Board of Directors. After a short period of alterations and repairs, the First National Bank of Hope opened on 4 March 1912. The bank was located on the first floor of the building. A portion of the first floor was used as a residence by the bank's cashier, A. Roy Hursberger. A section of the second floor was used as a meeting room by various organizations, particularly by the Moravian Grange. The bank was very succesful. Over its first ten years of business, its assets incresed brom the initial $25,000 to $264,455. During the Depression of the 1930s it never closed its doors, except during those days that the Federal Government ordered a national "bank holiday" (First Hope Bank). First Hope Bank (the National has been dropped from its name) is still, as of 2003, in business at the same location.

Samuel Read was a husband, a father and a grandfather. He well educated, and was a musician, a farmer and a banker. In addition to all these roles in his life, he was also intensely involved with the Methodist Episcopal Church. Samuel's family had come to the Methodist Church from a variety of different back grounds. His grandfather Samuel Read was probably raised as a Baptist, but had become a member of the Christian Church by 1842 (Snell 1881:666). His grandmother Maria Freese Read was baptised in Knowlton Presbyterian Church.. She may have remained a Presbyterian after her marriage. Samuel's maternal grandparents, David Brands and Sarah Angle were members of St. James Episcopal Church in Delaware. Samuel's mother Hannah was baptised in that church (Reuther n.d.). Samuel's father Aaron Read, may have attended the either Baptist or Christian Church in his youth; his older sister Jane was married to the pastor of the Johnsonburg Christian Church (Elder Jonathan S. Thompson). However, by 1851, Aaron and Hannah Read were affiliated with the Methodist Episcopal Church and probably had been for some time previous. The church in Mount Hermon was known throughout the nineteenth century as Greens Chapel. The church began on 8 February 1811 in the home of William Honeywell. The Honeywell famiily had originally been Baptist. In 1798, John Honeywell had left money in his will to build a Baptist academy in the area now called Mount Hermon. His descendants drifited away from the Baptists and eventually became Methodists. William Honeywell became one of the trustees of the new chruch. Thomas Green donated three-quarters of an acre to the new church for the purpose of erecting a house of worship. The first church was dedicated in 1812 and was used until 1848, when it was taken down and replace by a larger building. After 1848, the church was known as Greens Chapel. The congregation in Greens Chapel was the sister congregation of Zion M.E. Church in the village of Wolftown. The two congregations shared their minister. Samuel's sister Sarah Maria Cooke was married in 1851 to Andrew Cooke by the Rev. R. Van Horn, who is known to have been the pastor of Zion M.E. at that time (Snell 1881:634, 665-666). In 1860, Samuel s parents boarded the Rev. J.C.H. Brown who is known to have been the pastor of Zion M.E. between 1860 and 1861 (1860 United States Federal Census, Hope Township, Warren County, New Jersey, page 7; Snell 1881:634). It is probable that the Reverends Van Horn and Brown also served the congregation at Green's Chapel. Aaron and Hannah Read's farm was very close to Greens Chapel. Almost their entire family is buried in the church's cemetery. Samuel was probably brought up in the congregation at Green's Chapel. As an adult he participated fully in the life of the church. He was the church organist (Dale 2003) and served as the Sunday School Superintendant at the beginning of the twentieth century (Geiser 1983).

Samuel's career as a Sunday School Superintendent was related to me by Doris Geiser, a resident of Warren County. In 1983, I made my first research trip to the county. I had gotten lost and had stopped to ask directions to Mount Hermon. The gentleman giving me the directions suggested that I stop at Mrs. Geiser's house on the way as she had lived in Mount Hermon for a long time and would probably have some knowledge as to the Read family. You have to picture the scene...it was 27 June 1983, I had been out of college three years and had just become gainfully unemployed. I decided to take a week and go to Warren County to do some research before pounding the pavement for another job. Like most farily recent graduates, I was broke. I was driving a 12 year old Nova which came in about three different shade of undercoat grey and the original dingy white paint and had Illinois license plates. That old car snorted and belched, but it ran well...this is what I pulled into Doris Geiser's driveway with. In addition to the car, I had picked up a bad case of chiggers (those nasty little insects) in Union Brick Cemetery on the previous day, so my legs were just covered with hundreds of little red bumps that itched like the devil. Mrs. Geiser, confronted with this rather battered assortment of unknown kid (who claimed to be a Read) and old junker car from the Mid-west, was extremely gracious. She had known not the family of Samuel Read personally, as they had all moved away or died by the time she was a child. However, her mother had known them and had related some stories about them to Mrs. Geiser when she was growing up. According to Mrs.Geiser, Samuel Read had been the Sunday School superintendent at Mount Hermon when her mother was little girl back at the beginning of the twentieth century. Her mother remembered him as always carrying himself in a very erect manner. She recalled that he had been very strict but kind to the children and well liked by them (remember that Samuel had been raised in a an era when the dictum was that children were not to speck to adults unless spoken to). His wife, Lizzie Read had always worn black to church. After Samuel died, she left Mount Hermon and went to live with her son somewhere in New Jersey near New York City. The latter is borne out by the 1930 census data.

Samuel died after a short illness on 21 January 1914. He was 76 years old. The family buried him with his parents and children in Greens Chapel church yard (Dale 2003; Greens Chapel/Mount Hermon church yard). Lizzie was about 72 years old. She left Mount Hermon after Samuel's death and moved to her son Clifford's home in Ridgefield Park , Bergen County. Ridgefield Park was a suburb of New York City. Clifford worked as lawyer, but it is nor known whether he worked in New Jersey or commuted into New York City every day. Clifford had been married about ten years when his father died. He and Edna had three children, Edward, Florence (who was known by her middle name Hazel) and Marjorie. In 1930, the family lived at 125 Hudson Avenue. The family owned the home, which was valued at $9,000, free and clear of all leins and mortgages. They also owned a radio. Clifford's occupation in the census was given as lawyer, but the census indicated that he was not employed when the census was taken. It is not known whether he had retired (he was 62 years old) or if his company or businness had failed due to the Depression of the 1930s. Edna did not work in 1930, but all three children were employed. Edward, who was 23, worked as an operator for a radio company. Radio had exploded in the United States during the 1920s. Hazel was 20 and worked as a stenographer for a lawyer's office. The youngest, Marjorie, was 16. She was no longer attending school. Instead, she worked as a professional dancer on the stage. Ridgefield Park was only a short distance from the theaters just across the Hudson River in New York City (1930 United States Federal Census, Enumeration District 12-182, Village of Ridgefield Park, Overpack Township, Bergen County, New Jersey, sheet 3B, 4 April 1930). Table 5 summarizes the family in 1930.

Table 5: Household of Clifford and Edna Read in 1930
(1930 United States Federal Census, Enumeration District 182,
Ridgefield Park, Overpack Township, Bergen County, New Jersey, sheet 12B)

Name

Age

Birthplace

Clifford K. Read

62

NJ

Edna Read

62

NJ

Edward S. Read

23

NJ

Florence H. Read

20

NJ

Marjorie E. Read

16

NJ

Phebe E. Read

89

NJ

Clifford died the year after the census on 5 Augsut 1931. He was buried in Greens Chapel church yard. Lizzie had outlived all three of her children. She died four years later in 1935, she was about 94 years old. She too was buried in the Read family plot at Greens Chapel. I have no further documentation for the family after Phebe's death in 1935. The Read family plot is marked with a large monument, this monument was field checked on 27 June 1983:

Aaron Read
Born Oct. 11, 1806
Died Jan. 29, 1898
Hannah
his wife
Born March 29, 1814
Died Dec. 7, 1888
aged 75 years
Return dear friends and shed
no tears, I must lay here till
Christ appears, then, in his
Glorious image rise to meet
my saviour in the skies

Martha Read Decker
Born Aug. 6, 1843
Died Dec. 19, 1873
Kittle Decker
Born March 19, 1873
Died 4 May 1874

Ogden S. Read
Born July 27, 1866
Died Nov. 14, 1866
Arthur L. Read
Born Dec. 5, 1870
Died 30 May 1872

Samuel Read
Born July 25, 1837
Died 21 Jan. 1914
Elizabeth Stiles,
his wife
1841-1935
Clifford Kingsley Read
Born Nov. 30, 1867
Died Aug. 5, 1931

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REFERENCES

PRIMARY

Cemeteries

Greens Chapel or Mount Hermon United Methodist Church yard,
Mount Hermon, Hope Township, Warren County, New Jersey

Tombstone of Sarah Read Cooke
Tombstone of Kittle Decker
Tombstone of Martha Read Decker
Tombstone of Aaron Read
Tombstone of Arthur L. Read
Tombstone of Clifford Kingsley Read
Tombstone of Elizabeth Stiles Read
Tombstone of Hannah (Brands) Read
Tombstone of Ogden S. Read
Tombstone of Samuel Read

Directories

Weaver and Kern
1887 Warren County History and Directory. Press of the Review, Washington.

Newspapers

Warren Journal, 16 October 1851.

Probate Records

Surrogate Court Records, Warren County (WCSCR)
Belvidere, New Jersey

Orphans Court Minutes Book 6, pages 156-158, 231-232, 240
Surrogates Orders Book 1, page 172
Wills Book 10, pages 391-393

United States Federal Census, New Jersey

1840 New Jersey
Hope Township, New Jersey, page 5 of township
1850 New Jersey
Hope Township, New Jersey, page 437B
1860 New Jersey
Hope Township, Warren County, page 7
1870 New Jersey
Hope Township, Warren County, page 25
1880 New Jersey
Enumeration District 199, Hope Township, Warren County, New Jersey, page 7
1930 New Jersey
Enumeration District 12-180, Village of Ridgefield Park, Overpack Township, Essex County, New Jersey, sheet 3B

SECONDARY

Dale, Frank

2003 The Reads, Family and Friends. County Chronicles number 18.

Geiser, Doris

2003 Personal Communication 27 June 1983.

Kern, William MacKellar

1938 Kern and Ogden ancestors. Also allied families of Lanterman, Read, Crisman, etc. Manuscript on file, New York City Public Library.

Snell, James P. (Compiler)

1881 History of Sussex and Warren Counties, New Jersey, With Illustrations and Biographical Sketches of its Prominent Men and Pioneers. Everts and Peck, Philadelphia.

WEB SITES

Ruether, Jan

n.d. My Raub and More Ancestry. On line list of baptisms and other church records with links to transcriptions:

 

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This web site was produced by Timothy Doyle 5/5/98, <edrtjd@charm.net>