WARREN COUNTY EXTRACTS

From:

Gazetteer of the State of New Jersey

THOMAS F. GORDON

1834

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Abbreviations

co. county
C.T. county town (or county seat)
E. east
N. north
N.E. north east
N.W. north west
p-t. post town
S. south
S.E. south east
S.W. south west
t-ship township
W. west
W.C. Washington City (Washington, D.C.)

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"Alamuche, p-t. of Independence t-ship, Warren co., on the eastern part of the t-ship; by the post route 228 miles N.E. of W.C., and 65 from Trenton, and 17 from Belvidere the C.T.; seated on a small tributary of Pequest Creek, and near a lake of the same name, contains a grist and saw mill, a grain distillery, a store, tavern, and 12 or 15 dwellings. It is surrounded by a limestone soil of excellent quality, well cultivated" (page 1).

"Alamuche Lake is one of the many mountain ponds characterize this country, and which are, in many cases, reservoirs formed in limestone rock. This is about a mile in diameter, and sends forth a tributary to the Pequest creek" (pages 1-3).

"Alamuche Mountains is one of the chain of hills which bounds the valley of the Musconetcong creek in Warren county" (page 3).

"Anderson, p-t. of Mansfield t-ship, Warren co., on the turnpike road leading from Philipsburg to Schooley’s mountain, and between the Morris canal and Musconetcong creek, within a mile of either; distant by the post route from W.C. 205, from Trenton 49, and from Belvidere, the co. town, E. 11 miles; 16 miles from Easton, and 25 from Morristown; contains 2 stores and 15 dwellings; situate in a fertile limestone valley. Lands valued at $50 the acre" (pages 4-5).

"Asbury, p-t. of Mansfield t-ship, Warren co., in the S.W. angle of the t-ship near the Musconetcong creek, by post-route 199 miles from W.C., and 40 from Trenton, 11 miles S.E. from Belvidere; lying in a deep and narrow valley on a soil rich limestone, contains a Methodist church, 2 grist mills, 1 saw mill, an oil mill, a woollen factory, 1 tavern, 3 stores, and about thirty dwellings" (page 5).

"Bacon Creek a tributary of Pequest creek, Independence t-ship, Warren co., having a westerly course of 2 or 3 miles" (page 6).

"Bear Brook western branch of Pequest creek, rises in Hunt’s Pond, Green t-ship, Sussex co., flows S.W., through the S.E. angle of Hardwick t-ship, Warren co., and joins the main stream in the Great Meadows, Independence, t-ship, having a course of about 10 miles" (page 7).

"Beatty’s Town on the N.E. angle of Mansfield t-ship, Warren co., on the bank of the Musconetcong creek, and at the west foot of Schooley’s Mountains within 2 miles of the mineral spring and 16 E. of Belvidere. The Morris Canal is distant 2 miles from it on the north. The village contains 1 store, 1 tavern, a grist and saw mill, a school, and from 15 to 20 dwellings. the land around it is limestone, of excellent quality, and valued, in large farms at 50 dollars the acre" (page 7).

"Beaver Brook Warren co., rises from two branches, one in Hardwick t-ship, from Glover’s Pond, the other in Knowlton t-ship, from Rice’s Pond, which unite in Oxford t-ship, near to, and south, from the village of Hope, and thence join the Pequest creek, about 3 miles from its mouth, having a course of about 14 miles" (page 7).

"Belvidere, p-t., and seat of justice of Warren co., situate on the river Delaware, in Oxford t-ship, at the junction of the Pequest creek, with that stream; by the post road, 210 miles from W.c., and 54 from Trenton, 69 from Philadelphia, 13 from Easton, 70 from New York, and 19 from Schooley’s mountain springs. The town is built on an alluvial flat, based on limestone, and extends for about half a mile, on both sides of the creek, over which there are 2 brides for carriages, and 1 for foot passengers. The town, which rapidly increase, contains a spacious court house, of brick, with offices attached, and a prison in the basement story; the doors of which, to the honour of the county, are commonly unclosed, and its chambers tenantless, save by the idle warder; a very large and neat Presbyterian church, a Methodist church, an academy, in which the classics are taught; a common school, 2 grist mills, 2 saw mills, a clover mill, 6 stores, 3 taverns, a turning lathe, driven by water, and an extensive tannery; a bank chartered in 1829, with a capital of $50,000, but which may be extended; a county bible society, a county Sunday school union, auxiliary to the great charity established at Philadelphia; tract and temperance societies; 2 resident clergymen, 3 lawyers, and 2 physicians; 2 weekly journals, viz: The Apollo, edited by Franklin Ferguson; and the Warren Journal, by James J. Browne; and above 80 dwellings, most of which are neat and commodious, and many of brick and stone; among which, the residence of Dr. Green deserves particular notice, as well from its size and finish as from its beautiful and commanding situation. A very extensive business is done here in general merchandise, in flour and lumber, the saw mills being abundantly supplied with timber from the Delaware. The Pequest creek having a large volume of water, and a rapid fall, affords very advantageous mill sites. Within 144 chains from the mouth of the creek the available fall is 49 feet 64-1000, equal to 768 horse power, the whole of which is the property of Garret D. Wall, Esq., who offers mill seats for sale here on advantageous terms. But in addition to this great power derived from the creek, the Delaware river, within 2 miles of the town, offers a still greater, where the whole volume of that stream may be employed. A company has been incorporated, with a capital of $20,000, for erecting a bridge across the river at or near this place, for which three sites have been proposed. 1st. At the foul Rift, where the channel is 170 yards wide. 2d. The mouth of the Pequest, where it is 205 yards. 3d. At the Deep Eddy, above the creek, where the channel is divided by Butz’s island, and the stream on the Jersey side is 127 yards, the island 86 yards, and the remaining water 23 yards. The proposed rail road through New Jersey, from Elizabethtown, is designed to cross the Delaware here, and to connect with the Delaware and Susquehanna rail road (pages 8-9).

"Bethel, mount and church, Mansfield t-ship, Warren co., 12 miles E. of the town of Belvidere" (page 13).

Blairstown: see Gravel Hill entry.

"Bloomsbury, p-t. of Greenwich t-ship, Warren to., on the turnpike road from Somerville to Philipsburg, and on both sides of the Musconetcong creek, part of the town being in Hunterdon co.; by the post-route 198 miles form W.C., 49 from Trenton, and 14 S. from Belvidere, 18 miles N.S. from Flemington; contains 1 grist mill, 1 oil mill, a cotton manufactory, 2 taverns, 1 store , and from 30 to 40 dwellings; the soil of the valley is rich limestone" (page 15).

"Bridgeville, small hamlet of Oxford t-ship, Warren co., 4 miles E. of Belvidere the county seat" (page 18).

"Broadway, village, of Mansfield t-ship, near the S.W. boundary line, Warren co., on the turnpike road from Philipsburg to Schooley’s mountain, about 10 miles from the former, and 14 from the later, contains a store and tavern, 2 grist mills, 1 saw mill, and 10 or 12 dwellings. It lies in the valley of the Pohatcong creek, upon a soil of fertile limestone" (page 19).

"Centreville, small village, of Knowlton t-ship, Warren co., on the road leading from Hope to Knowlton mills and Columbia; about 4 miles from the first and last, and 10 N.E. from Belvidere; contains a tavern, store, smith shop, Presbyterian church, and several dwellings" (page 29).

"Change Water furnace, on the Musconetcong creek in Mansfield t-ship, Warren co., 3 miles from the village of Mansfield, and 10 S.E. from Belvidere, the county town" (page 29).

"Columbia p-t. and village of Knowlton t-ship, on the Delaware river, near the mouth of the Paulinskill, distant 253 miles from W.C., 94 from Trenton, and 10 from Belvidere; contains 2 taverns, a store, a Presbyterian church, a glass house, a saw mill, and 20 dwellings. The town is prettily situated on a high bank of the river, and surrounded by a limestone soil, tolerably well cultivated. A company was incorporated by act of 12th February, 1833, with authority to employ $100,000 in the conduct of the glass works here" (page 33).

"Danville, post-office, Warren co." (page 37).

"Dry Branch tributary of Paulin’s creek, Knowlton t-p. Warren co." (page 44).

"Fineville, small village on the Musconetcong creek, a mile above its mouth, and 19 miles S.W. from Belvidere, the county town, and 8 miles from Easton; lies in a very narrow but fertile valley; contains a grist mill, saw mill, and oil mill, a woollen manufactory, 1 tavern, 1 store, and from 15 to 20 dwellings" (page 51).

"Glover’s Pond Hardwick t-ship, Warren co., the extreme source of Beaver Brook" (page 59).

"Gravel Hill, village and p-t. of Knowlton t-ship, Warren co., in the valley of the Paulinskill, near the east line of the t-ship, distant by post road from W.C. 243 miles, from Trenton 85, and from Belvidere N.E. 15 miles; contains a large grist mill, tavern, store, tannery, and 6 or 8 dwellings; soil limestone" (page 60). Transcribers note: Gravel Hill later became Blairstown.

"Great Meadows, a large body of 6 or 8000 acres of meadow land, in Independence t-ship, Warren co., watered by the Pequest creek" (page 60).

"Greenwich, t-ship, Warren co., bounded N. by Oxford t-ship, N.E. by Mansfield, S.E. by the Musconetcong creek, which separates it from Hunterdon co., and W. by the river Delaware. Centrally distant S. from Belvidere, the county town, 10 miles; greatest length N. and S. 13 miles; breadth E. and W. 11 miles; area 38,000 acres; surface hilly, the south Mountain covering the t-ship. Drained by Lopatcong, Pohatcong and Musconetcong creeks, all which flow S.W. through the t-ship to the Delaware river. The turnpike road from Somerville runs N.W. and that from Schooley’s mountain W. through the t-ship to Philipsburg, on the Delaware, opposite Easton. Below that town the Morris canal commences, and runs across the t-ship. The population in 1830 was 4486. Taxables in 1832, 830; at that time the t-ship contained 266 householders, whose rateables did not exceed $30 in value; 9 stores, 17 fun of stones for grinding grain, 1 fishery, 2 carding machines, 1 cotton factory, 3 oil mills, 1 fulling mill, 3 distilleries, 930 horses and mules and 1265 neat cattle over 3 years of age. Although this t-ship be very mountainous, it is one of the most productive, not only of the county, but of the state. Whilst the mountains assume a granitic character, the valleys are everywhere underlaid with limestone, and their soils fertile. The valleys of Musconetcong, the Pohatcong and Lopatcong, and even the small vales through which their tributaries wander, are highly cultivated and improved, and there are farmers who send to market from one thousand to three thousand bushels of wheat annually, besides other agricultural productions. The most interesting minerals yet discovered in the t-ship, are marble, steatite or soapstone, and iron" (page 62).

"Hackettstown, p-t. Independent [sic] t-ship, Warren co., lying between the morris canal and Musconetcong river, which are here about one mile distant from each other. The village is by the post road, 215 miles N.E. from W.C., 59 from Trenton, and 15 E. from Belvidere, the county town, and 6 miles from Belmont Spring, Schooley’s Mountain; contains 5 large stores, 2 taverns, and from 30 to 40 dwellings of wood and brick, 1 Presbyterian and 1 Methodist church, an academy, in which the classics are taught, 2 common schools, 1 resident Presbyterian clergyman, and 3 physicians, 2 large flour mills, a woollen manufactory and a clover mill. The town is built upon cross streets; is surrounded by fertile limestone country, where farms sell at from 50 to 75 dollars the acre. This vicinity is rapidly improving by means of the Morris canal" (page 64).

Hainesburg: see Sodom entry.

"Hardwick t-ship, Warren co., bounded E. by Stillwater and Green t-ships, of Sussex co., S. by Independence t-ship, W. by Knowlton, and N. by Pahaquarry t-ships. Centrally distant N.E. From Belvidere, 16 miles; greatest length N. and S. 11; breadth E. and W. 8 miles; area 24,320 acres. Population in 1830, 1962. There were in the t-ship in 1832, 82 householders, whose rateable estates did not exceed $30 in value; 5 stores, 13 pairs of stones for grain, 2 carding machines, 1 wool factory, 5 saw mills, 56 tan vats, 4 distilleries; and it paid state and county tax of $967.59. The surface of the t-ship is generally hill, and is drained southwesterly by Paulinskill, Beaver brook, and Bear branch of the Pequest creek, and also by some limestone sinks; Marksboro’, Lawrenceville, Johnsonburg, and Shiloh, are post-towns of the t-ship. Lime and slate alternate in the t-ship, as in Knowlton; the ridges being of the latter, and the valleys of the former; both are productive, except where the slate rock approaches too near the surface. White Pond in this t-ship, about a mile north of Marksboro’ is a great natural curiosity. (See Marksboro’)" (pages 66-67).

"Hope, p-t. on the line dividing Knowlton from Oxford t-ship, on a branch of the Beaver brook, 212 miles from W.C., and 59 miles from Trenton, and 10 N.E. from Belvidere; contains a grist mill and saw mill, 6 stores, 2 taverns, and about 30 dwellings, an Episcopal and a Methodist church. The soil around is limestone, and well cultivated. This was originally a Moravian settlement" (page 68).

Hope Township, did not exist in 1834, not in Gordon.

"Hughesville, village, on the Musconetcong creek, about 5 miles from its mouth, 15 miles S. of Belvidere, and 6 S.E. from Philipsville, in Greenwich t-ship, Warren co., and in a narrow and deep valley; it contains a tavern, a store, a school and from 15 to 20 dwellings. Lead or zinc ore is said to be found in the mountain north of town; but most probably the latter, as the hill is part of the range of the Hamburg or Wallkill mountains, in which that mineral abounds" (page 70).

"Imlaydale, pleasant hamlet on the Musconetcong creek, Mansfield t-ship, Warren co., 4 miles S. of the village of Mansfield, and with 1 of New Hampton, in the adjacent county of Hunterdon, and 12 miles S.E. of Belvidere; contains a mill, a store, and 3 dwellings" (page 71).

"Independence, t-ship, Warren co., bounded N. by Hardwick t-ship, E. by Green t-ship, Sussex co., S.E. by Roxbury t-ship, Morris co., S.W. by Mansfield, and W. by Oxford t-ship. Centrally distant N.E. by from Belvidere, the county town, 14 miles; greatest length 9 miles N. and S.; breadth E. and W. 8 ½; area, 29,440acres; surface hilly on the E. and W. but a valley runs centrally N.E. and S.W. through the t-ship which is drained by the Pequest creek, and on which there is a large body of meadow land. Bacon creek is a small tributary of the Pequest, which unites with it above the village of Vienna. The Musconetcong river forms the S.E. boundary, and in its valley, parallel therewith, runs the Morris canal. Alamuche, Hackettstown, and Vienna are post towns of the t-ship; there is a Quaker meeting house in the N.E. part of the t-ship. There were in the t-ship in 1830 2,126 inhabitants; in 1832 429 taxables, 10,000 acres of improved land, 414 horses and mules, and 1066 neat cattle, over 3 years of age; 146 householders, whose rateables did not exceed $30; 8 stores, 11 pairs of stones for grinding grain, 6 saw mills, 21 tan vats, 4 distilleries; and it paid in t-ship taxes for the poor and roads, $900; and in county and state tax, $880.95. This ranks among the most valuable precincts of the state. The valleys are of fertile limestone, and the hill sides have been subjected to cultivation to a very great extent. The ridges which cross the t-ship from the S.W. to the N.E. are metalliferous, and upon the "Jenny Jump," in the N.W., a gold mine is said to exist. Preparations have ostensibly been made for smelting the ore, but the "wise ones" have little confidence in the undertaking, and consider the mineral discovered, if any, to be pyrites or fool’s gold" (pages 71-72).

"Jenny Jump, a noted eminence in the northern part of Oxford t-ship, Warren co., extending N.E. and S.W. for about 10 miles, and into Independence t-ship" (page 73).

"Johnsonburg, p.t. and village of Hardwick t-ship, Warren co.; centrally situate in the t-ship, by post route, 218 miles N.E. of W.C., 65 from Trenton, and 16 from Belvidere; contains an Episcopal and a Presbyterian church, a church belonging to the sect of "Christ-i-ans", 2 taverns, 2 stores, many mechanic shops, a grist mill, and from 25 to 30 dwellings. The surrounding soil is of fertile limestone, and well cultivated. A small tributary of the Bear branch of Pequest creek, flows through it, and gives motion to the mill of the town" (page 74).

"Knowlton t-ship, Warren co., bounded N. by Pahaquarry t-ship, E. by Hardwick t-ship, S. by Oxford t-ship, and W. by the Delaware river. Centrally distant N.E. from Belvidere, 10 miles; greatest length 10 miles, breadth 10 miles; area 44,800 acres. The Blue mountain lies upon the northern boundary, an the Delaware makes it way through it at the celebrated Water Gap, at the N.W. point of the t-ship. The t-ship is every where hilly, and is said to derive its name from its knolls. It is centrally drained by Paulinskill, and its branches; on the south-east by Beaver brook , and north-east by the Shawpocussing creek. Gravel Hill, Sodom, Columbia, Centreville, Hope and Ramseyburg, are villages and post towns of the t-ship. Population in 1830, 2827; taxables in 1832, 630. There were in the t-ship in 1832, 132 householders, whose ratables did not exceed $30, 13 pairs of stones for grinding corn, 7 saw mills, 10 tan vats, 4 distilleries, 1 glass manufactory, 744 horses and mules, and 1390 neat cattle over three years of age; and the t-ship paid $1300 of t-ship use, and $1550 for state and county purposes. Slate and lime alternate throughout the t-ship; the hills are commonly of the one, and the valleys of the other.

A slate quarry above Columbia is extensively wrought, from whence excellent roof and writing slates are taken. There is 1 Presbyterian and 1 Episcopalian church in the t-ship" (pages 75-76).

Note: Knowlton Township is currently bordered by Pahaquarry, Blairstown and Hope Townships. Blairstown and Hope Townships did not exist in 1834, they were created out of parts of Knowlton Township (Blairstown and Hope) and Oxford Township (Hope only) at a later date.

"Knowlton, post town and village of the above t-ship, on Paulinskill, 2 miles north from its mouth, and by the post route 217 from W.C., 64 from Trenton, and 10 from Belvidere; contains 1 tavern, 1 store, a large grist mill and saw mill, a clover mill, and 6 or 7 dwellings. The country around is hilly, soil limestone" (page 76).

"Lawrenceville, Knowlton t-ship, Warren co., on both banks of the Paulinskill, 15 miles N.E. of Belvidere, and 3 miles W. of Marksboro’; contains a store and tavern, and 10 or 12 scattered dwellings. The country around it is hilly; the soil slate on the left and limestone on the right side of the creek" (page 77).

"Lawrenceville, town of Hardwick t-ship, Warren co., near the western t-ship line, 82 miles N.E. from Trenton, and 15 from Belvidere" (page 77).

"Long Bridge, over Pequest creek, Independence t-ship, Union co., at the head of the Great Meadows, 16 miles N.E. from Belvidere. There is a hamlet here of 6 or 8 dwellings, and the neighborhood is settled by members of the society of Friends, who have a meeting house within 2 miles of the Bridge. The soil of vicinity is limestone, naturally fertile, and susceptible of improvement, as may be supposed from the character of its cultivators; for "Friends" of all vanities, dislike most, vain labour" (pages 80-81).

Note: Gordon appears to have made a mistake in this entry. The county should be Warren, not Union. Morris County lies between Warren and Union Counties. There is no Independence Township in Union County; in fact there is only one Independence Township listed in Gordon, and that was located in Warren County. Finally, Gordon gives the bridge’s distance and direction from Belvidere as "N.E. 16 miles." Union County is to the south and east of Belvidere and is certainly more than 16 miles from Belvidere.

"Lopatcong Creek, rises in the southern part of Oxford t-ship, Warren co., and flows thence by a S.W. source 9 or 10 miles through Greenwich t-ship, to the river Delaware, 3 or 4 miles below Philipsburg, giving motion to several mills in its course, and draining a fertile valley of primitive limestone" (page 81)

"Mansfield t-ship, Warren co., bounded N.E. by Independence, S.E. by the Musconetcong river, which separates it from Morris and Hunterdon cos., S.W. by Greenwich t-ship, and N.W. by Oxford t-ship. Centrally distant from Belvidere, the county town, 9 miles; greatest length on the river 15 miles; breadth 6 ½ miles; area, 33,000acres; surface mountainous; drained by the Musconetcong and Pohatcong creeks, which, divided by a chain of lofty hills, run parallel to each other, but at a distance of nearly 4 miles apart. There is a mineral spring, a chalybeate, in the S.W. part of the t-ship, much frequented. Population in 1830, 3303. In 1832 there were 800 taxables, 169 householders, whose rateable estates did not exceed $30; 11 stores, 12 pairs of stones for grinding grain, 8 carding machines, 5 saw mills, 1 furnace, 1 fulling mill, 36 tan vats, 7 distilleries, 862 horses and mules, and 1407 neat cattle in the t-ship; and the t-ship paid $1200 road and poor tax; and $1659.42 state and county tax. The Morris canal winds through the hills the whole length of the t-ship. This is one of the richest t-ships in the state, having a large proportion of valley land underlaid with limestone. Large quantities of wheat are raised, and some farmers well as many as 3000 bushels annually. Iron ore abounds in the hills, and silver is "said" to have been discovered near the spring, but most probably this is iron pyrites" (page 83).

"Mansfield or Washington, p-t. of Mansfield t-ship, Warren co., founded in 1811, on the turnpike road leading from Philipsburg to Schooley’s mountain; by the post route 202 miles from W.C., and 46 from Trenton, and 8 ½ miles S.E. of Belvidere, the county town, 30 from Morristown, 12 from Easton, and 3 from Musconetcong creek; contains 1 tavern, 2 stores, from 35 to 40 dwellings, 1 Methodist and 1 Presbyterian church, and 1 school. Iron ore abounds in Scott’s mountain north of the village. Around the town the soil is limestone, fertile and well cultivated, and valued at from 20 to 50 dollars the acre. The town is supplied with excellent water from a spring on the south, which is distributed by 4 public fountains" (page 83).

"Marksboro’, p-t. and village of Hardwick t-ship, Warren co.; centrally situate in the t-ship, and by the post route distant from W.C. 240, from Trenton 82, from Belvidere 15 miles, 10 from Newton, and 12 from Columbia, and on the south bank of the Paulinskill; contains a Presbyterian church, a grist mill, a cotton manufactory making 1500 lbs. of yarn per week, a clover mill, 1 lawyer, 1 physician, and about 20 dwellings. The town itself lies on a slate ridge, which is fertile and well cultivated, but the soil on the north side of the creek is secondary limestone; the most valuable slate lands rate, at about $30, and the lime, at about $40 the acre. The celebrated White Pond lies about 1 mile north of the town. Its shores and bottom are covered with vast quantities of snail shells, and its waters afford abundance of white perch and other fish" (page 84).

"Merritt’s Branch of Pohatcong Creek, rises in Oxford t-ship, Warren co. and flows S. through Greenwich township, to its recip0ient, having a course of about 7 miles" (page 86).

"Musconetcong Creek or River, issues from the Hopatcong pond, or lake, in Jefferson T-ship, Morris co.; and flows by a course S.W. and nearly straight, through a longitudinal valley of Schooley’s mountains, for nearly forty miles. This valley is bounded S.E. by the Musconetcong and Schooley’s mountains, and on the N.W. by a southern continuation of the Hamburg hills; it is narrow and deep, and has throughout its whole length a limestone base. The stream has great volume, and gives motion to a very great number of mills for various purposes" (page 98).

"New Village, p-t., of Greenwich t-ship, Warren co., on the turnpike from Schooley’s mountain to Philipsburg, and on the Morris canal, by the post-route 196 miles from W.C., 52 from Trenton, and 10 miles from Belvidere, the county town; contains 1 store, 1 tavern, and 10 or 12 dwellings. It is surrounded by a fertile limestone country" (page 109).

"Oxford t-ship, Warren co., bounded N.W. by Knowlton; E. by Hardwick and Independence; S.E. by Mansfield; S. by Greenwich t-ships and W. by the Delaware River. Greatest length, N.E. and S.W., 16 miles; breadth, N.W. and S.E., 5 ½ miles; area 42,000 acres. Drained chiefly by the Pequest creek and its tributary, Beaver Brook. Population in 1830, 3665; taxables, in 1832, 800. In 1832, the township contained 254 householders, whose ratables did not exceed $30 in value, 17 stores, 18 pair of stones for grinding grain, 1 carding machine, 7 saw mills, 3 furnaces, 10 tan vats, 4 distilleries, and 862 horses and mules, and 1407 neat cattle; and it paid for tax for township use, $1200, and for state and county purposes, $2229.02. Belvidere, the county town, lies on the Delaware river, in this township, and Bridgeville, Oxford and Concord are small villages from 3 to 4 miles distant from it. The surface of the township is much broken and it possesses a great variety of soil and cultivation. The mountains, which are composed of granitic rock and crowned with wood, cover a considerable portion of it, and are cultivated wherever the hopes of reward will justify the labour. The valleys of limestone are very productive; and large quantities of wheat are grown for market. Green-pond is a small lake 1 1/2 mile long by 3/4 of a mile wide, on the S.E. declivity of Jenny Jump mountain; mountain and bog ore abound, and manganese on the Delaware below Foul Rift. The towns are Belvidere the seat of justice of the county, Bridgeville, Oxford, Concord, and Roxburg" (page 112).

"Oxford small hamlet of Oxford t-ship, Warren co., three miles S.E. of Belvidere, the county town; contains a Presbyterian church, a tavern, 1 grist and 1 clover mill, and 10 or 12 dwellings" (page 112).

"Oxford Furnace, and Village, on a branch of the Pequest creek, near the E. line of Oxford township, and five miles E. of Belvidere, the seat of justice, at the N.W. foot of Scott’s mountain. This mountain vale is a very ancient site for the manufacture of iron, a furnace having been erected here more than seventy years since by the ancestor of the present owners, Messrs. Robison; but it had been out of blast for than 20 years, when Messrs. Henry and Jordon, of Pennsylvania, undertook to renew operations. These gentlemen have obtained a lease of the furnace, with 2000 acres of woodland, and have rebuilt the works. Abundance of excellant iron ore is found in the mountain a few hundred yards from the furnace; and the lessees have sunk several shafts, and are now working a vein of magnetic ore about 13 feet thick, enclosed by walls of rotten mica. This ore is very rich and easily smelted. Old excavations are visible in many places, and shafts have recently been discovered more than 100 feet deep, and drifts exceeding 120 yards in length. The rock of Scott’s mountain is primitive, and its constituents are found separately in masses, and also variously combined with each other, with hornblende and with iron of various species, forming granite, sienite, &c. The whole range of hills, of which Scott’s mountain is part, forms a very interesting study for the mineralogist and geologist" (page 112).

"Pahaquarry, N.W. t-ship of Warren co., bounded N.E. by Walpack t-ship; S.C., by Hardwick and Knowlton t-ships; S.W. and W. by the river Delaware. It lies wholly between the Blue mountain and the river; is centrally distant, N. from Belvidere, 15 miles. Greatest length, N.E. and S.W., 13 miles; breadth, 2 ½ miles; area, 12,8000 acres; surface, mountain and river bottom. Population by census of 1830, 258. In 1832, it contained 13 householders, whose ratables did not exceed $30 in value, but no store, and but one grist mill, 4 mill saws, 59 horses and mules, and 121 neat cattle above the age of three years, and paid a state and county tax of $109.61. Vancamp brook flows southerly through the N.W. part of the township. Pahaquarry is the name given to a small cluster of houses, situate in the northern part of the township. The Water Gap, by which the Delaware flows through the Blue mountain, is on the southwestern boundary of the township. Brotzmanville is the post-office. A road has lately been made through the Gap, and partly cut out of the mountain at the expense of the state. Before it was made, even foot passengers were unable to follow the river through the Gap on the Jersey side without the aid of rope ladders to assist them over the precipitous rocks. The narrow margin above the river, which nowhere exceeds the breadth of the fourth of the mile, is fertile. Upon the Pennsylvania side, this margin is wider and underlaid with limestone" (page 113).

"Paulinskill, creek of Sussex and Warren counties, which rises by two branches; the easterly one from a pond on the south of Pimple hill, in Hardiston t-ship, and flowing thence N.S. through Newton township, into Frankford township; the westerly one, from Long and Culver’s ponds, at the foot of the Blue mountain, in Frankford, in which township the branches unite near the town of Augusta, and flow thence by a south-west course of 22 or 23 miles, to the Delaware river: the whole length of the stream, by its eastern branch, may be 35 miles. It gives motion to many mills, and flows through a very fertile country of lime and slate formations, separating them for a considerable part of its course" (page 121).

"Pequest Creek, rises by two branches, in the eastern part of Sussex co., which unite in Indepence t-ship, Warren co., and flow thence by a S.W. course, through Oxford t-ship, to the Delaware river, at the town of Belvidere. Its whole length is about 30 miles. This is a large and rapid stream, affording abundant water-power, and draining, by the main stem and branches, an extensive valley of primitive limestone. (See BELVIDERE)" (page 124).

"Philipsburg, town of Greenwich t-ship, Warren co., on the left bank of the Delaware river, opposite the borough of Easton in Pennsylvania, 14 miles below the town of Belvidere, and 60 miles above Trenton. Contains about 20 dwellings, 4 stores, and 2 taverns. The Morris canal communicates with the Delaware here, opposite to, and short distance below, the basin of the Lehigh canal. A bridge of wood or three arches, covered, 600 feet long, and 24 feet wide, over the Delaware, which cost $80,00, connects Philipsburg with Easton" (page 126).

"Pleasant Valley, of the South mountain, Mansfield t-ship, Warren co., through which runs a small tributary of the Pohatcong creek. The soil here, as in other valleys of the t-ship, is of primitive limestone. There is a small hamlet in the valley, at which there is a grist mill, and several dwellings, upon the turnpike road to Easton" (page 128).

"Pohatcong Creek, Warren co., rises near the N.E. boundary of Mansfield t-ship, and flows S.W. through that and Greenwich t-ships, by a course of three of four and twenty miles to the Delaware river, 8 or 9 miles below Philipsburg. This fine stream flows through and drains a wide and fertile valley of primitive limestone, which is well cultivated, and produces larga quantities of wheat. There is a fine view of the valley from the south-eastern acclivity of Scott’s Mountain, on the road to Oxford furnace; the creek runs somewhat parallel with the Musconetcong, both following, the range of the mountains, and at their mouths are scarce two miles asunder" (page 128).

"Ramseyburg, p-t. of Knowlton t-ship, Warren co., on the bank of the Delaware, 215 miles N.E. from W.C. and 59 from Trenton, and 5 miles N. from Belvidere. Contains a tavern, store, and Episcopal church, and some half dozen dwelling" (page 134).

"Rocksbury, village of Oxford t-sp, Warren co., 5 miles S. of Belvidere, upon the road leading to Philipsburg; contains a tavern, store, 2 grist and 1 oil mill, an air furnace for small castings, and from 15 to 20 dwellings" (page 138).

"Sand Pond, the source of Stout’s brook, on the N. line of Hardwick t-ship" (page 143).

"Scott's Mountain, lying in Greenwich, Oxford and Mansfield t-ships, Warren co., forms part of the chain of South mountain, of which this portion covers much of the area of the three t-ships above named. The height of the mountain here may be from 700 to 800 feet above tide, and it is composed of granitic rock, based on, or breaking through limestone. It abounds with iron of several varieties, which, for near a century, has been extensively worked, near Oxford furnace; where Messrs. Henry and Jordan are, now, extensively engaged in the iron manufacture. The mountain is generally well wooded , and the valleys fruitful" (page 146).

"Shiloh, p.t. in the S.W. angle of Hardwick t-ship, Warren co., 12 miles N.E. of Belvidere, and 60 miles from Trenton" (page 146).

"Sodom, p.t. of Knowlton t-ship, Warren co., on Paulinskill, 12 miles N. of Belvidere, 4 E. from Columbia; contains a grist and saw mill, tavern, store, and some half dozen dwellings. Some smelting works have lately been erected here, said to be for precious metals, discovered in the Jenny Jump mountain" (page 148). Transcribers note: Sodom later became Hainesburg.

"Stewartsville, p.t. of Greenwich t-ship, Warren co., centrally situate in the t-ship, on Merritt’s branch of Pohatcong creek, 10 miles S.E. of Belvidere; contains a tavern, a store, and 10 or 12 dwellings; surrounded by a fertile limestone country, and lying about a mile south of the Morris canal, and about 5 miles east from Eaton, Pennsylvania" (page 153).

"Still Valley, of Greenwich t-ship, Warren co., lying between Lopatcong and Pohatcong creeks, and extending N.E. from the river Delaware. This is a rich valley of limestone land, thickly settled, and highly productive in wheat. There is a post-office here named after the valley, on the turnpike road, between 4 and 5 miles from Easton, Pennsylvania" (page 153).

"Stout's Branch, of Paulin’s creek, rises in Sand Pond, Hardwick t-ship, Warren co., at the foot of the Blue mountain, and flows by a southerly course of 7 or 8 miles, to its recipient" (page 154).

"Straw, hamlet of Greenwich t-ship, Warren co., about 5 miles S.E. of Philipsburg, and 12 miles S. of Belvidere; contains 3 or 4 dwellings only" (page 154).

"Townsbury, post-office, Warren county" (page 160).

"Vienna, p.t. of Independence t-ship, Warren co., on the Pequest creek, near the S.W. boundary of the t-sp, by the post road 220 miles from W.C., 54 from Trenton, and 12 from Belvidere, upon the verge of the Great Meadow; contains a Presbyterian church, a store, tavern, and 6 or 8 dwellings" (page 166).

"Walnut Valley, post-office, Warren co." (page 167).

"Washington, village of Mansfield t-ship, Warren county. (See Mansfield.)" (page 171).

"Yard's Branch, of Paulinskill, rises in the Blue mountains, in Pahaquarry t-ship, and flows S.W. through Knowlton t-ship to its recipient, near the village of Sodom having a course of about 8 miles" (page 171).

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This web site was produced by Timothy Doyle 5/5/98,
Questions regarding content should be directed to Esther Doyle Read readgen@adelphia.net